Injury Prevention

This has been mentioned in every TIP so far. A good warm up is important, good posture and breathing is most important, managing load is important, and training all sides of the triangle (strength, flexibility and cardiovascular conditioning) is important. However,

GOOD RUNNING FORM is the key to best prevention.

We learn to how to swim, how to cycle, how to play any team sport, but we don’t learn how to run. Some people naturally have a good running style, but if running is just hard work, then some training in technique could be your best prevention.

The most common injuries with running all involve the lower limb. These include the hip, knee, achilles, ITB (iliotibial band) and plantarfascia. All these issues have their own set of risk factors, but what’s important is to work out why they developed in the first place.

Do you lean forward from the hips or waist?

Does your head move too much up and down, or side to side?

Do your arms cross over the midline, or shoulders hunch?

Do your feet come to or cross the midline?

Do your knees go in and feet go out, or your ankles roll in?

Do you over stride, or are a stomper or toe runner?

So many things to think about.!!!!

Gait pattern and biomechanical alignment need to be assessed, but a common problem with all these issues is weakness in the stabilising muscles! Namely the deep abdominal, hip (glut medius and maximus), inside knee (medial quadricep) and calf muscles.

Today the focus is on STRENGTHENING.

The most common injuries with running all involve the lower limb. These include the hip, knee, achilles, ITB (iliotibial band) and plantarfascia. All these issues have their own set of risk factors, but what’s important is to work out why they developed in the first place.

Gait pattern and biomechanical alignment need to be assessed, but a common problem with all these issues is weakness in the stabilising muscles! Namely the deep abdominal, hip (glut medius and maximus), and inside knee (medial quadricep) muscles.

If there is restriction in hip mobility then this can inhibit the stabilizing muscles from being activated. So, strengthening is NOT going to be effective until this has been corrected. Specific problems need to be assessed so a tailored exercise program can be given.

Lower limb tendons need to be robust. This gets built up over time and can take years, but is the biggest protector of lower limb injuries. For those who a new to running must be careful of not loading too much too soon. Strengthening all these main muscles are the key to preventing injuries and should be done once -twice per week.

The exercises below are some good basics which will strengthen the stabilising and most important muscles for running. A good guide is 3 SETS OF 10 REPS

Lunges, bridges, squats, calf raises, donkey kicks and lateral walks with band. (no picture)

More advanced exercises include, jump squats, running lunges, box jumps, hopping side to side, burpees and high skipping with opposite arm. The list is endless.

GET INJURY FREE GET STRENGTHENING!